Summer Work

Upper School Summer Work, by Department

English Department

ENGLISH 1, Grade 9

1) IXL LANGUAGE ARTS:

  • Log into your IXL account for GRADE 8 (DO NOT COMPLETE ANY WORK IN GRADE 9)
  • You can choose those skills in which you feel you could use the most practice.
  • DO NOT work on exercises that your class has already completed this year
  • You must work on an exercise until you achieve a score of 80 or BETTER to receive credit
  • You decide how many exercises to complete, and your work will be graded accordingly:
    • 30 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive an A+/100
    • 20 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive B+
    • 15 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive C+
    • 10 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive D+
    • Less than 10 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive INCOMPLETE

2) READ TWO WORKS FROM THE LISTS BELOW: one novel, and one non-fiction. PLEASE KEEP A READER’S JOURNAL FOR BOTH WORKS.Click this link to guidelines for The Reader’s Journal.YOU MAY TYPE your journal. PLEASE DO NOT consult any of the on-line resources which summarize the chapters for you. This would be considered plagiarism.This journal will help you to remember what you have read. This will help you to be prepared to discuss, analyze, compare and contrast upon your return.I suggest you make one journal log every chapter. The journal will be collected and graded. Please purchase both works. We will start off the year by working on group projects which will require you to have the works you read in hand.Follow the guidelines which are linked below. PLEASE feel free to contact me if you get stuck, have questions, or need help: vminnick@calvertonschool.org

A) Please read ONE novel from this list and KEEP A READER’S JOURNAL.

Novel Study

    • Empire of the Sun, J.G. Ballard
    • Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte
    • A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens
    • The Book Thief, Markus Zusak
    • Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway
    • The Things they Carried, Tim O’Brien
    • A Raisin in the Sun, Lorraine Hansberry

B) Please read ONE non-fiction work from this list and KEEP A READER’S JOURNAL.

Non-Fiction Works

    • Bridges of Spies, Giles Whittell
    • Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson
    • The Bookseller of Kabul, by Asne Seierstad
    • Letters to My Daughter, Maya Angelou

Please use this guide for your Reader's Journal - How to Keep A Reader's Journal.


ENGLISH 2, Grade 10


1) IXL LANGUAGE ARTS:
  • Log into your IXL account for GRADE 9 (DO NOT COMPLETE ANY WORK IN GRADE 10)
  • You can choose those skills in which you feel you could use the most practice.
  • DO NOT work on exercises that your class has already completed this year
  • You must work on an exercise until you achieve a score of 80 or BETTER to receive credit
  • You decide how many exercises to complete, and your work will be graded accordingly:
    • 30 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive an A+/100
    • 20 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive B+
    • 15 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive C+
    • 10 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive D+
    • Less than 10 exercises completed at 80% or better will receive INCOMPLETE

2) READ TWO WORKS FROM THE LISTS BELOW: one novel, and one non-fiction. PLEASE KEEP A READER’S JOURNAL FOR BOTH WORKS.Click this link to guidelines for The Reader’s Journal.YOU MAY TYPE your journal. PLEASE DO NOT consult any of the on-line resources which summarize the chapters for you. This would be considered plagiarism.This journal will help you to remember what you have read. This will help you to be prepared to discuss, analyze, compare and contrast upon your return.I suggest you make one journal log every chapter. The journal will be collected and graded. Please purchase both works. We will start off the year by working on group projects which will require you to have the works you read in hand.Follow the guidelines which are linked below. PLEASE feel free to contact me if you get stuck, have questions, or need help: vminnick@calvertonschool.org

A) Please read ONE novel from this list and KEEP A READER’S JOURNAL.

Novel Study

    • Fahrenheait 451, Ray Bradbury
    • Their Eyes were Watching God, Zora Hurston Neale
    • 1984, George Orwell
    • Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger
    • One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    • The Good Earth, Pearl S. Buck

B) Please read ONE non-fiction work from this list and KEEP A READER’S JOURNAL.

Non-Fiction Works

    • The Great Escape, Paul Brickhill
    • Reading Lolita in Tehran, Azar Nafisi
    • The Wild Places, Robert MacFarlane
    • A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Ishmeal Read
    • Silent Spring, Rachel Carson
    • The Miracle Worker, William Gibson

Please use this guide for your Reader's Journal - How to Keep A Reader's Journal.


ENGLISH 3 and 4
Grade 11 & 12 non-ib

Teacher: Ramona Hodgkins, rhodgkins@calvertonschool.org
Choose one of the following texts to read over Summer break:

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Stephen Chbosky
The Scarlet Letter,
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Animal Farm,
George Orwell
A Thousand Splendid Suns,
Khaled Hosseini

Students will close read each text we study during the course of the year.This is difficult for some students because they have been taught to respect books and to preserve them so that others may enjoy them.The books we will read for this class, however, are the property of the individual student, not the school.In order to study them carefully, the student must underline specific passages and ideas in order to locate them later for further review, and there is no better show of respect for an author than engaged reading.The kind of notes the student takes are a personal matter, but it is strongly recommended that they include the following:

  • Underlining in the text
    • words, phrases, sentences or (rarely) whole passages that the student finds to be of particular beauty, interest, or importance
    • unfamiliar vocabulary words to be looked up in the dictionary
    • passages that the student wishes to bring up in class discussion
    • the introduction of characters and character description
    • important events
    • examples of literary techniques and terms
    • examples of an author’s individual style
    • anything that is “noteworthy”
  • Marginal Notes – reminders as to why a passage was underlined
    • new discovery such as “setting is Gulf Stream/Cuba” or “boarding school” or “84 days/no fish”
    • short phrase referring to an important event such as “Pudge gets nickname” or “line cuts old man’s hands”
    • reference to literary terms such as “foreshadowing, metaphor, and allusion” etc.
    • comparison to another work such as “contrast with Ponyboy in The Outsiders
    • any thematic reference such as “man against nature” or “desire for individuality”
    • any repeated usage like “eye motif”or “DiMaggio”, or “animal imagery”
    • change in narrative voice
    • anything “noteworthy”
    • v. for a an unfamiliar word the needs a definition
    • notes needing amplification should be written in a notebook with class notes and reflective journal
    Please use this guide for your Reader's Journal - How to Keep A Reader's Journal.

IB LITERATURE SL/HL 1 grade 11

Teacher: Dan Waldspurger, dwaldspurger@calvertonschool.org
There is no particular, assigned reading for English over the summer; rising Juniors should select a novel of their personal choice to enjoy over the summer.

In addition, all students in IB English are required to have a licensed copy of Scapple on their computers. This program will be used nearly daily in class to take notes and to make presentations. It can be purchased from http:www.literatureandlatte.com at the educational price of $12.00 for a lifetime license. I recommend students new to Scapple watch the onsite video tutorial or watch the tutorial videos on YouTube.

IB LITERATURE SL/HL 2
grade 12

Teacher: Dan Waldspurger, dwaldspurger@calvertonschool.org
There is no particular, assigned reading for English over the summer, but Inferno, by Dan Brown, is recommended for rising Seniors.

In addition, all students in IB English are required to have a licensed copy of Scapple on their computers. This program will be used nearly daily in class to take notes and to make presentations. It can be purchased from http:www.literatureandlatte.com at the educational price of $12.00 for a lifetime license. I recommend students new to Scapple watch the onsite video tutorial or watch the tutorial videos on YouTube.



English as a Second Language (ESL)


ESL - LEVEL 1 and 2

Teacher: Robert Metcalf, rmetcalf@calvertonschool.org
Over the summer please close read The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. Follow the Close Reading Guidelines below. On the second day of class, you will be given an in-class writing assignment on a choice of topics that will demand a thorough understanding of the novel. Your close reading notes will also be graded.

Students will close read each text we study during the course of the year.This is difficult for some students because they have been taught to respect books and to preserve them so that others may enjoy them.The books we will read for this class, however, are the property of the individual student, not the school.In order to study them carefully, the student must underline specific passages and ideas in order to locate them later for further review, and there is no better show of respect for an author than engaged reading.The kind of notes the student takes are a personal matter, but it is strongly recommended that they include the following:

  • Underlining in the text
    • words, phrases, sentences or (rarely) whole passages that the student finds to be of particular beauty, interest, or importance
    • unfamiliar vocabulary words to be looked up in the dictionary
    • passages that the student wishes to bring up in class discussion
    • the introduction of characters and character description
    • important events
    • examples of literary techniques and terms
    • examples of an author’s individual style
    • anything that is “noteworthy”
  • Marginal Notes – reminders as to why a passage was underlined
    • new discovery such as “setting is Gulf Stream/Cuba” or “boarding school” or “84 days/no fish”
    • short phrase referring to an important event such as “Pudge gets nickname” or “line cuts old man’s hands”
    • reference to literary terms such as “foreshadowing, metaphor, and allusion” etc.
    • comparison to another work such as “contrast with Ponyboy in The Outsiders
    • any thematic reference such as “man against nature” or “desire for individuality”
    • any repeated usage like “eye motif”or “DiMaggio”, or “animal imagery”
    • change in narrative voice
    • anything “noteworthy”
    • v. for a an unfamiliar word the needs a definition
    • notes needing amplification should be written in a notebook with class notes and reflective journal



World Languages

SPANISH I

There is no summer work assigned for this course.

SPANISH II

Click here to download the Spanish II summer work packet.

SPANISH III

Click here to download the Spanish III summer work packet.

SPANISH IV/SL SPANISH 1

Click here to download the Spanish IV summer work packet.

SPANISH V/SL SPANISH 2

Click here to download the Spanish V summer work packet.

spanish - advanced conversation and composition

Click here to download the Advanced Conversation and Composition Spanish summer work packet.

FRENCH I

There is no summer work assigned for this course.

FRENCH II

There is no summer work assigned for this course.

FRENCH III

Students entering French III should read Suivez la Piste over the summer. On the first day of class you will have to answer questions about your reading.

FRENCH IV (SL FRENCH 1)

Students entering French IV should read Maigret et le Clochard over the summer. On the first day of class you will have to answer questions about your reading.

FRENCH V (SL FRENCH 2)

Students entering French V should read Le Petit Prince over the summer. On the first day of class you will have to answer questions about your reading.


History and the Social Sciences

Comparative Government

There is no assigned summer work for this course.

UNITED STATES HISTORY

There is no assigned summer work for this course.


IB HISTORY SL/HL 1

Students should spend the summer familiarizing themselves with the structure of the course and the topics to be covered, the papers and their rubrics, the requirements for Internal Assessments, and IB command terms, which are found at the end of IB Year 1 packet. The attached documents (see link below) will provide all the necessary information to start the junior year on the right foot.

  • IB Student Profile Y1
  • IB Year 1 Packet
  • OPVLC chart
  • OPCVL new guide 2016

    IB HISTORY PACKET

After you have finished familiarizing yourself with the course and the IB requirements, please read Chapter 1, pg 1-18, in France Since 1815 by Evans and Godin and answer the following questions:

  1. What were the causes of the French Revolution?
  2. Name and briefly describe the phases of the Revolution.
  3. What has been the legacy of the Revolution?

This assignment will be due the first week of class. If you have any questions, please send an email to Mr. Bedea at Chrisbedea@hotmail.com

IB HISTORY SL/HL 2

Students should spend the summer doing research, gathering evidence and preferably having a draft of their IA (Internal Investigation) paper. Please look over your original proposal from January, along with Mrs. Peer’s feedback and continue working on your topic. Please keep in mind the following deadlines to stay on track with your work:

  • By July 1 – Students choose an appropriate IA topic and research question. Students should be familiar with the layout requirements and rubric for the IA.
  • By July 30 – Students have collected and begun review of evidence/sources
  • By August 14 –Students should share their topic, research question, and sources with Chris Bedea via email to chrisbedea@hotmail.com. Please title your email IA Proposal and include your name.

IB PSYCHOLOGY SL/HL 1 & 2

Please read a small book by Deci - Why We Do What We Do.

Sciences

PRE-IB INTEGRATED SCIENCE 1

There is no summer work assigned for this class.

PRE-IB INTEGRATED SCIENCE 2

There is no summer work assigned for this class.

IB PHYSICS SL 1

There is no summer work assigned for this class.

IB PHYSICS sL 2

Please read "The Manga Guide to Electricity" by Kazuhiro Fujitaki, Matsuda, Trend-Pro Co., Ltd.

  • ISBN-10: 1593271972
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593271978

IB BIOLOGY HL 1

There is no summer work assigned for this class.

IB BIOLOGY SL/HL 2

Please read Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5 Billion-Year History of the Human Body by Neil Shubin (ISBN-13: 978-0307277459). You do NOT need to annotate/close read this book, just enjoy it! It really is a captivating summary of how we became the species we are today! Digital and paper editions are both acceptable.

There is no written assignment needed, however you will need the foundational knowledge in this book in order to be successful as we continue our study of Biology by exploring the connections between genetics and evolution and then move into anatomy and physiology in the second year.

IB ENVIR. SYS. 1

There is no summer work assigned for this class.

IB ENVIR. SYS. 2

Please read Last Chance to See by Douglas Adams and Mark Carwardine (ISBN-13: 978-0345371980). Digital and paper editions are both acceptable.

You do NOT need to annotate/close read this book.However, on the first day of school, you will need to submit the following (either digitally via Moodle, or physically on paper or written in the book):
For each of the 10 chapters, you will need to write down the following for the main species that he goes searching for:

  • Name of the species
  • Current Conservation Status (ex. extinct, endangered, threatened, recovering)
    • You may need to carry out a little research using online sources to find this information

Mathematics

ALGEBRA 1

Welcome to Algebra 1! In order to best prepare and get the most out of your Algebra 1 class next year you will need to practice some of the material you have learned in past mathematics classes. Using the website www.ixl.com, you will be required to reach 80% accuracy in each of the assigned topics listed below.This is due on the first day of school and will count as your first quiz grade.

Instructions for accessing IXL are on the back of this letter. If you have questions about the summer work or the course, please send an email to Mr. Dorsey (wdorsey@calvertonschool.org).We look forward to having you in Algebra 1 next year!

Sincerely,

Your Math Teachers

Under 8th Grade

Under Algebra 1

C8 – evaluate numerical expressions involving integers

I1 – write variable expressions

V5 – evaluate multi-variable expressions

I2 – simplify variable expressions involving like terms and the distributive property

V12 – multiply using the distributive property

V4 – multiplication with exponents

V13 – add and subtract like terms

V7 – power rule

W2 – write an equation from words


W7 – solve two-step equations




GEOMETRY

Welcome to Geometry! In order to best prepare and get the most out of your Geometry class next year you will need to practice some of the material from your past mathematics classes. Using the website www.ixl.com, you will be required to reach 80% accuracy in each of the assigned topics below.Your username and password will be the same as this past year.This work is due on the first day of school and will count as your first quiz grade.

If you have any questions about the summer work or the class, please email Mr. Dorsey at wdorsey@calvertonschool.org.

Yours truly,

Your Math Teachers

All sections can be found under Algebra 1

B7 – Evaluate variable expressions involving rational numbers

C5 – Solve proportions

J4 – Solve two-step linear equations

J5 – Solve advanced linear equations

S3 – Find slope from two points

Z4 – Add and subtract polynomials

Z10 – Multiply polynomials

AA1 – GCF of monomials

AA2 – Factor out a monomial

AA3 – Factor quadratics with leading coefficient 1



ALGEBRA 2

Welcome to Algebra 2! In order to best prepare and get the most out of your Algebra 2 class next year you will need to practice some of the material from your past mathematics classes. Using the website www.ixl.com, you will be required to reach 80% accuracy in each of the assigned topics below.Your username and password will be the same as this past year.This work is due on the first day of school and will count as your first quiz grade.

If you have any questions about the summer work or the class, please email Mr. Dorsey at wdorsey@calvertonschool.org.

Yours truly,

Your Math Teachers

All sections can be found under Algebra 1

I2 – Simplify variable expressions involving like terms & distributive property

J11 – Solve linear equations mixed review

K10 – Solve advanced linear inequalities

K11 – Graph solutions to advanced linear inequalities

S5 – Find slope and y-intercept

S11 – Linear equations: solve for y

S16 – Find x- and y-intercepts

S24 – Write equations for parallel and perpendicular lines

T3 – Graph 2-variable linear inequalities

T6 – Solve systems of linear inequalities by graphing

Z10 – Multiply polynomials

AA8 – Factor polynomials


IB MATH STUDIES SL1

Please click here for IB Math Studies SL1 summer work.

IB MATH STUDIES SL 2

Please click here for IB Math Studies SL2 summer work.

IB MATH SL 1 (Pre-Calculus)

There is no summer work assigned for this course.

IB MATH SL 2 (Calculus)

There is no summer work assigned for this course.

Visual Arts and Music

IB VISUAL ART SL/HL 1

Teacher: Barbara Brower, bbrower@calvertonschool.org

Click here to download packet for IB Visual Art SL/HL 1.

IB VISUAL ART SL/HL 2

Teacher: Barbara Brower, bbrower@calvertonschool.org

Please click here to review the entire schedule for next year and put these dates into your planner.

September 5th
4-6 completed pages for the Process Portfolio are due (Power Point)
See examples in our shared G Drive. You may use anything in your journal that has
been inspiration to you so far. Your process
pages do not have to directly relate to one of your pieces of art. They just
record your journey , research, discoveries and reflections. You should have
plenty of material in your journals to complete 4-6 pages in power point. Please
don’t hesitate to send me questions or ask for help through the summer.


September 5- Completed pieces from your summer work. You must have 3 completed IB art theme pieces finished at thispoint.


September 11th
Final selection of artists and artworks for Comparative Study due (Word) Submit
a word document showing your 3 different artworks by two different artists and
explaining why you choose them. Remember that they must be from different
cultures and times. Try to choose artists that you will be able to do research
on with relative ease. Also try to choose pieces of art that have some
similarities. See examples on our shared G Drive as well as a reliable sources
list.


September 11th
Plans for two more Art Theme pieces and journal entries due. Go over with Mrs
Brower for approval to start.


IB MUSIC SL/HL 1

Students must practice over the summer. "An instrument left alone for the summer is like taking many many steps backward."


IB MUSIC SL/HL 2

Students must practice over the summer. "An instrument left alone for the summer is like taking many many steps backward."


Directions for Logging into IXL - New Students!

IXL is a comprehensive math and English review site with an unlimited number of math/grammar practice questions in hundreds of skills. One of the best things about IXL is that your child can access it from home, so you have a chance to see your child's progress!

To get your child started on your home computer, please follow these easy steps:

1.Go to www.IXL.com/signin/calverton
(If you just go to ixl.com, then you must type the “@calverton” after your username).

2.Enter your child's username and password and click Sign in.
(Note: If your child was at Calverton for previously, they will use the same username and password.)

Username: first initial last name (example: Joe Smith is jsmith)
Password: calverton

Select a specific skill to practice from the list of skills. You can place your mouse over any skill to see a sample question and click on the link to begin.

Click on the Awards tab. Each grade level presents challenges for your child to conquer and virtual prizes to be uncovered. Place your mouse over any challenge to begin.

In addition to making math/grammar practice exciting, IXL is designed to help your child learn at his or her own pace. The website is adaptive and will adjust to your child's demonstrated ability level. The site also saves all of your child's results, so you can monitor your child's progress anytime by clicking on the Reports tab.

I hope you'll encourage your son or daughter to use IXL daily. Here's to a year of working together to make math fun for your child!

If you have any questions and/or concerns regarding IXL, please contact Dawn Rhoads at drhoads@calvertonschool.org.
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